Over My Wed Body

Veronica Blade

      

At twenty-four, Bailey Thayer is no stranger to heartache. She’d idolized her older brother’s best friend for most of her life. But Hunter Evermond had grown up and outgrown their tiny town in Bride, Texas. When she meets up with him two years later in Las Vegas for a friend’s wedding, they drink too much, have way too much fun and end up way too married. The next morning, he pushes hard for an annulment and Bailey returns to Bride to mend her shattered heart.

When his best friend, Blake, breaks his leg and ends up in a cast, he’s unable to do the ranch work. Hunter leaves L.A. and arrives at the B&B ranch to help the people who were more of a family to him than his real parents ever were. When looking through the annulment papers to give Bailey the copy she demands, he discovers he and Bailey are still married. She’s furious and barely speaking to him. Hunter needs to make things right with her but doesn’t make it easy. Hunter needs to make things right and do it fast before Blake finds out he did anything with Bailey or the unfortunate fiasco might ruin their friendship. Hunter can’t risk losing the even one of the Thayers. A quick and quiet divorce is the only way out. Hunter doesn’t dare think about how beautiful and confident Bailey has become or how he’s dying to kiss her and see if she tastes as sweet as she did two years ago.

No matter how nice Hunter treats her, no matter how he ogles her or seems to care, Bailey mustn’t forget that the last time she’d fallen for his charms and he’d dumped her the next morning. She has more important things to worry about, like the future of the family ranch and how to make a profit. For her own survival, she has to let him go.

 

Veronica Blade resides in both southern California and northern Nevada with her husband, daughters and furbabies. By day she runs the family business, but each night she slips away to spin her tales. She writes stories about falling in love and lives vicariously through her characters. Except her heroes and heroines lead far more interesting lives—and they are always way hotter.